Archive for research

Health & Migration Webinar at United Nation City

I am honoured to be in the panel for Migration and Health called ‘True Stories’ by World Health Organisation at the United Nation City in Copenhagen on Tuesday 8th of August.

Speakers:

  • Bernadette Kumar, Associate Professor – Department of Community Medicine and Global Health, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Domenico Sergi, Curator and Community Engagement Coordinator, Horniman Museum and Gardens, United Kingdom
  • Mahboobeh Rajabi, Digital Artist, Community Arts North West, United Kingdom

Moderator:

  • Dr Erinma Ochu, Lecturer, Digital Science Communication, School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, United Kingdom

The webinar focus was the importance of responsible, meaningful and compelling communication efforts to evoke positive change for migrants, refugees and host communities. During the course of the discussion, we hope to provide some food for thought about the importance of telling compelling stories in order to connect and
engage with audiences, while at the same time staying factual and reducing sensationalism.

Key Objectives:

  • To offer insights into the way narratives (stories) can be constructed and communicated in order to positively impact on public opinion and government policy.
  • To explore ways of effectively dispelling public health myths regarding refugees and migrants.
  • To promote social inclusion and respect for diversity via formal and informal means.

I talked about Community Arts as one of the most important Social Model, Intercultural Communication and the importance of the arts and what healthcare professionals can learn and offer to effective advocacy around migration and health.

I also focused on the importance on creating opportunities for Refugees and Asylum Seekers to respond to Media to create the communication that will show their true identity and not only the traumatic image of the force leave. I explained the different methods of the responds which are the creative ways of making video, animation and theatre that both give opportunity to refugees and asylum seekers to improve their confidence and an educational tool to raise awareness to the public around their situation.

The importance of empowering the individuals was also one of the main parts of the discussion that I discussed. I mentioned the value of the support through community Arts that helps Refugee and Asylum Seekers to reconstruct their identity which is the most important key to help them to engage to society and building their lives.

I believe there is a huge need to speak up about the issues that is not getting resolved around migration and especially Refugees and all caught up to the paper works based on the structures that needs to be changed. So many organisations across the world are working on same old actions which needs a risk to change. These webinars starting by global organisations is a great start and I will be a part as much as it needs to see the change. There are so many evidence on some great projects that took risks and made changes.

It was also amazing to hear the important points from Dr Bernadette Kumar around the understanding of the myth around migrants and refugees health and what needs to be done. Also the experience of the works of  Dr Domenico Sergi in the Horniman Museum and what he mentioned regarding engaging public to these works to understand migrants and refugees was the key points to take more actions.

You can watch the full webinar here soon …

My latest video

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Hello Universe!

The brochure above is the latest project that I am on as an digital Artist and its called “Rule 35” by CAN (Community Arts North West Manchester)

The promo video I produced is just below  🙂

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypM74YFlNE0

And I just need a bit rest in whole my life and plan to do some thing for my website not just this blog and bunch of update. But at last I am posting in these busy days of my life having adventure as I call them “placeless memories” that is so relatable to my situation. (And I just made up an English word from relate and yes let’s say relatable  🙂  )

I am doing good in my Korean studying and I am proud universe, I am proud that I can speak, read and write in Korean, just got the intermediate level but my research and my passion for Far East of Asia is on. As it is the only thing that left in my life  :l

beside the second year of Japanese and reading and writing …. That’s … let’s change the subject “How are you ddoooin universe?” (with the Joe accent of series of friends)

YUP I’m on that too … After I sort most of my life out I am excited for a surprise interview that I will reveal later … It’s a SURPRISE  🙂

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Asia Art Archive 🙂

An other Stop Motion Animation

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Happy New Year Universe!

It’s been a great year 2014 beside all the problems that I don’t want to go on my year review AT ALL, I am alive and healthy!

What’s better than that  🙂  is actually my new stop motion animation for second year of DO I.T. course at CAN (Community Art Northwest) in Manchester that i finished last year and it’s online.

And greater news is that it will be shown in Motion North that is a cool event to show case motion design and animation works but in a professional level and mine there is an unexplainable feeling.

I know I am still learning as a trainee in animation and graphic design but it means a lot to me and I will work on better animations in the future soon.

and here you go with its video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lxz1XyaQQQ0

Let’s go to P.S of the life:

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Beside being sick in the holidays and missing Christmas lunch that became an other tragic story on the top of all the tragic stories of my life, I am out of my studying schedule that need a good planning and I am in a “Ookey, let’s begin” mode that you still didn’t fo the first step and a good planning.

because when ehat is left and stays for you to survive protect it and … I have no idea what I just wrote but that means I have to survive some how .. in life … yeah …

Wish everyone an amazing 2015 with lots of good GOOD news

Animation Project finish point …

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Konnichiwa Universe …!

So Finally the Amaterasu animation project about the lovely deity of the sun finished.

Had the meeting yesterday and it got the road for the future and hopefully movies.

Again thanks to amazing Yuko and my amazing work place CAN 🙂

There is lots to do now to focus every thing, beside one of the animations that i animated a heart and it looks SO natural and I am so happy about.

My study schedule doesn’t look really good and it really needs time and working that I couldn’t do enough these days.

It’s not that bad but from my point of view am I satisfied? … NOPE. and that’s the thing.

I need work as much as I am satisfied and I need more planning.

but in the mean time it’s a pause and breathe that will help whole the thing.

🙂

I have to finish this post soon, need to get home early and I really like productive days.

So yes it’s done by me but the story of JPN mythology just began.

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Productive Japan Day

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Hello to the universe and all the creatures inside!

By the changes that comes up for “Goddess of the sun, Amaterasu” Next week is taking to completing in CAN and it’s all for good.

Finishing the second year of my Japanese course till the end of November and passing by 85 out of 100 for the one before the main exam is a ” You are AWESOME” to my forehead.

I finished a draft video for the graphic and animation works I want to do for Heart’s core and it made me being on track and I felt SO good on Friday.

The week a head gonna be super busy too but all good and productive and I am getting good skills in the tech course in contact theater that was again a better point to the projects I am working on.

And the website and focusing the works is again a priority.
IT NEEDS TO BE DONE!

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The meeting today with Yuko Howes the amazing Japanese lady from JSNW (Japanese Society of North West) was made me think of I forgot to add the photo of Japan Day!

So The Japan Day in Manchester was on 25th of August 2014 with lots different activities from showing martial arts to the costume contest mostly from animation and manga characters and information about the Japanese art (like craft and paintings and etc.) and culture.

And Yuko invited me being as the guest of fantastic tea ceremony of Japan and I absolutely LOVED it.

The adventure was cool and the venue “Midland Hotel” was great, and I think bigger venue was even better because LOTS of people came and yeah! … it was full with people who were interested in Japan and it made me super happy  🙂

Here are some photos:

And finally me as a Japanese warrior … Kind a … ^_^

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Amaterasu …The Goddess of the Sun

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hi-wave

So basically today the post production is about to finish now of:

The Goddess of the Sun

Amaterasu

It just need to have the credits

And a great thing me and Katrina did was that we create our own logo

AGAIN I am going to keep the mystery till the video goes viral  🙂

So YES we are really getting there

Such a great journey and I am so happy that it is just the beginning of visualizing a part of my research from the Far East of Asia

It was a productive day with twitter and google plus in drop on session of the next years of       Do I.T.

So I feel GREAT but tired … looking forward to hang out this evening with friends

P.s the image at the bottom is a cool Abstract art of Shinjuku/Tokyo that I LOVED

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My First stop motion video, Introducing my Research :)

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My first stop motion video is on line now.

The video introducing artists in Do I.T. project by Community Arts North West and of course introducing me and my research and I am so excited about.

Have a big performance tomorrow beside my other works and videos with “Young Producers” that are on line too and will write more soon.

 

DO I.T. in Motion

 

CAN Young Producers Interviews

Seasonal Imagery in Japanese Art

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From ancient times to the present, the Japanese people have celebrated the beauty of the seasons and the poignancy of their inevitable evanescence through the many festivals and rituals that fill their year—from the welcoming of spring at the lunar New Year to picnics under the blossoming cherry trees to offerings made to the harvest moon. Poetry provided the earliest artistic outlet for the expression of these impulses. Painters and artisans in turn formed images of visual beauty in response to seasonal themes and poetic inspiration. In this way, artists in Japan created meditations on the fleeting seasons of life and, through them, expressed essential truths about the nature of human experience.

This sensitivity to seasonal change is an important part of Shinto, Japan’s native belief system. Since ancient times, Shinto has focused on the cycles of the earth and the annual agrarian calendar. This awareness is manifested in seasonal festivals and activities. Similarly, seasonal references are found everywhere in the Japanese literary and visual arts. Nature appears as a source of inspiration in the tenth-century Kokinshu(Collection of Ancient and Modern Poems), the earliest known official anthology of native poetry (rather than Chinese verse). These poems, produced by courtiers who embraced a highly refined aesthetic sensibility, not only celebrated the sensual appeal of elements of the natural world, but also imbued them with human emotions. Melancholy sentiments, invoked by a sense of time passing, loss, and disappointment, tended to be the most common emotional notes. This attitude can be seen in such visual arts as Buddhist and Shinto paintings of the Heian period that include lovely but short-lived blossoming cherry trees. Autumnal and winter scenes and related seasonal references, such as chrysanthemums and persimmons growing on trees that have already lost their foliage, are eloquent expressions of this same sentiment.

 

A distinctive Japanese convention is to depict a single environment transitioning from spring to summer to autumn to winter in one painting. For example, spring might be indicated by a few blossoming trees or plants and summer by a hazy and humid atmosphere and densely foliated trees, while a flock of geese typically suggests autumn and snow, and barren trees evoke winter. (Because this convention was so common, seasonal attributes could be quite subtle.) In this way, Japanese painters expressed not only their fondness for this natural cycle but also captured an awareness of the inevitability of change, a fundamental Buddhist concept.

 

The confluence of Shinto and Buddhism in the use of seasonal references demonstrates the central position of this practice in Japanese culture. As indicated above, cherry blossoms can be found in pictures illustrating Buddhist as well as Shinto concepts, with both expressing the beauty and brevity of nature. Similarly, folding screens decorated with ink monochrome paintings showing a transition from one season to the next initially were placed in the private quarters of Buddhist monks. Ritual implements and decorative items used in Buddhist temples and practice are often covered with flowers, birds, and other scenes from nature.

 

While the pictorial compositions that encompass all four seasons together present a broad view, more compact versions also appear. During the Momoyama and Edo periods, seasonal flowers and plants such as plum blossoms, irises, and morning glories became the entire focus of painting compositions. Similarly, decorative works such aslacquerware containers, kimonos, and ceramic vessels are frequently ornamented in this way. When natural elements are employed as decorative motifs, they are frequently stylized to heighten the ornamental effect. Once again, these visual scenes often have literary references, heightening the image’s mood and cultural meaning.


Department of Asian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Resource: Here

“Ouija” not the board game, THE MOVIE

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So again an interesting news that I found during my research.

I had ideas of visualizing some board games but it’s not easy to bring the world of a board game to reality, movement and live world and at the same time keeping the mood, battles and stories.

The fascinating news I have is that in October this year a movie will be released that made based on a board game.

OK, The thing is that, that board game is “Ouija” … an ancient Chinese board game CPU_SeriousFace_Emoticon

 

I never played it and get to know it through the research.

The thing is I am LOOKING FORWARD to see how they made the movie because … just have a look at some reviews and criticism:

“Following its commercial introduction by businessman Elijah Bond on July 1, 1890, the Ouija board was regarded as a harmless parlor game unrelated to the occult until American Spiritualist Pearl Curran popularized its use as a divining tool during World War I.

Mainstream religions and some occultists have associated use of a Ouija board with the concept of demonic possession, and view the use of the board as a spiritual threat and have cautioned their followers not to use a Ouija board.

Despite being criticized by the scientific community and deemed demonic by Christians, Ouija remains popular among many”

Most religious criticism of the Ouija board has come from Christians, primarily evangelicals in the United States. In 2001, Ouija boards were burned in Alamogordo, New Mexico byfundamentalist groups alongside Harry Potter books as “symbols of witchcraft.”[8][9][10] Religious criticism has also expressed beliefs that the Ouija board reveals information which should only be on God’s hands, and thus it is a tool of Satan.[11] A spokesperson for Human Life International described the boards as a portal to talk to spirits and called for Hasbro to be prohibited from marketing them.

Bishops in Micronesia called for the boards to be banned and warned congregations that they were talking to demons and devils when using the boards.

 Ouija boards have been criticized in the press since their inception; having been variously described as “‘vestigial remains’ of primitive belief-systems” and a con to part fools from their money. Some journalists have described reports of Ouija board findings as ‘half truths’ and have suggested that their inclusion in national newspapers lowers the national discourse overall.

And there is more.

So it’s not a surprise that I am excited to see the movie.

My ideas is completely different from some of the examples I found so I just keep the inspiration fresh that it will be unique and not any thing else.

ouija

 

Japanese Mythology

Japanese MythologyThis is a featured page

[I really like reading and studying the mythical creatures that had the great effect on every artistic field such as painting, movies, animation and etc. So I would like to share some of them in here that helped my research too:) ]
Japanese Mythology contains a wide variety of unique and bizarre monsters. Yet others are counterparts to creatures in the neighbouring mythologies of Korea and China. Many are seldom known in the Western world, even today.Below is a list of Japanese creatures collected:
               – Akamataa

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AkamataaThis is a featured page

The Akamataa is a serpent spirit in the Japanese folklore. It is a mix of a woman and a snake.
Akamataa

Oni (鬼?) are a kind of yōkai from Japanese folklore, variously translated as demonsdevilsogres or trolls. They are popular characters in Japanese artliterature and theatre.[1]

Depictions of oni vary widely but usually portray them as hideous, gigantic ogre-like creatures with sharp claws, wild hair, and two longhorns growing from their heads.[2] They are humanoid for the most part, but occasionally, they are shown with unnatural features such as odd numbers of eyes or extra fingers and toes.[3] Their skin may be any number of colors, but red and blue are particularly common.[4][5]

They are often depicted wearing tiger-skin loincloths and carrying iron clubs, called kanabō (金棒?). This image leads to the expression “oni with an iron club” (鬼に金棒 oni-ni-kanabō?), that is, to be invincible or undefeatable. It can also be used in the sense of “strong beyond strong”, or having one’s natural quality enhanced or supplemented by the use of some tool.[6][7]

 

Akki - Mythical Creatures Guide Oni

GashadokuroThis is a featured page

A Gashadokuro according to Japanese folklore is a giant skeleton many times taller than a human. It is though to be made of the bones of people who have starved to death. After midnight the ghost roams the streets making a ringing noise that sounds in the ears. If people do not run away when the Gashadokuro approaches it will bite off their heads with its giant teeth.(Source – A Little Lesson in Japanese Ghost Lore: http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/691563/a_little_lesson_in_japanese_ghost_lore.html?cat=10)Gashadokuro_Appeared 

GhidorahThis is a featured page

Ghidorah (Ghidrah, Ghidora, King Ghidorah, the three-headed monster, Monster Zero) is a fictional three-headed dragon-like monster featured in severalGodzilla films. It is often depicted with two wings, two feet, three heads and a tail. It always appears as an antagonist to Godzilla and Earth at large. Originally it arrived by a magnetic meteorite before being repelled into space (proving it can survive in a vacuum). Aliens return with Ghidorah as their mind controlled slave. Its havoc is again stopped, even killing the creature in the 1968 movie.The monster returns in several resurrected forms thereafter.
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GojiraThis is a featured page

Gojira monsters are huge sea monsters that are longer than the blue whale. They are extremely muscled and lean. The muscles make up at least 80 percent of its body weight. Its skeleton weighs nearly nothing but is sturdy enough to hold all of the muscle. These monsters have small eyes and usually use smell and hearing for tracking down food and enemies. Their thick tails with fringed fins make it very very fast. Its claws are longer than a bus. If you see a Gojira, do not get anywhere near teeth, because they are sharper than glass shards. The tongue has a gooey liquid on it that makes prey stick on. Its slitted nostrils are admirable to Voldemort or gorillas. It is at least 90 times bigger than the blue whale and the blue whale is what it eats. Extremely dangerous. Do not come in contact with a king of Gojiras, or it will swallow you whole in a second. Try to kill it somehow. Its most sensitive part is the underbelly.
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KappaThis is a featured page

The Kappa (Kawataro, Kawako) is a dwarf-like water demon of Japan, sometimes listed as one of the Obake. They resemble shrivelled old-men, with webbed hands and feet, sporting a tortoise shell. Skin colour ranges from green to blue to yellow, and even red. Their face can contain a beaked nose or else look like a monkey. Crowning their head of page-boy style hair is a circular depression filled with water. A kappa covered in hair is known as a Hyosube. They are known to speak Japanese fluently.An origin for the demons could be they are the ghosts of drowned souls. Any pond or river may have one. They possess immense strength and can easily overpower a human. Although the source of this power comes from the stored water within the dish on their head. Emptying the dish reduces the kappa to frailty. This may be done by bowing to the kappa upon encounter. In a show of manners the creature will bow back and thus pour out the contents of its might.
Activities from this demon can range from mischievous to deadly. It enjoys passing gas and forever gives off a fishy odour. It may also try to look up women’s kimonos and swim down the plumbing to stroke a persons bottom as they defecate. Else they will overpower a person or animal to drown them. Once drowned they remove a person’s entrails through their backside, favouring the liver or something the Japanese call the shirikodama.Besides fresh flesh, the kappa also partakes in vegetarian cuisine. It enjoys eggplants and cucumbers. It is said carving your name and age into a cucumber, then throwing it into the water for a hungry kappa, will ensure that kappa cannot harm you. Though it is also dangerous to swim soon after eating a cucumber.Kappa also loved contests. They would challenge passersby to such games as pull-my-finger and sumo wrestling. Should the demon win, they usually drowned and ate you. One tale tells of a samurai who accepted a kappa’s request for tug-of-war. Fortunately he outsmarted the kappa and used a horse to pull in his stead. The outmatched demon fell, spilling the contents of its head upon the ground. Now too weak to get away, the kappa promised to teach the samurai the trick of bone-setting if it could be released.

Many kappas have proven to be quite knowledgeable on subjects of medicine and irrigation. In a case where one kappa lost its arm to a frightened horse, it petitioned the villagers for the limb’s return. The community forced the kappa to sign a contract with its webbed hand. From then on the kappa delivered to the village piles of fish, and warned of other kappa passing through the area.

Source: Myths and Magic Encyclopedia – http://mythsandmagicencyclopedia.wikifoundry.com/page/Kappa
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NingyoThis is a featured page

ningyo (head of a human body of fish) form

Ningyo is a Japanese water fairy who cries tears of pearls. Some say that Ningyo has the head of a human and the body of a fish. Other believe it is clad in sheer silk robes that move about it, like waves. Ningyos dwell in gorgeous palaces beneath the sea, and are very seductive.

refrence: http://www.mythicalcreaturesguide.com/page/Japanese+Mythology